Impact on Quality of Life of Chronic Paediatric Dermatoses on their Family Members – A Study from Tertiary Care Hospital in North India

  • Akriti Gakhar Maharishi Markandershwar Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Maharishi Markandeshwar Deemed to be University, Mullana, Ambala, Haryana
  • Sanjeev Gupta Maharishi Markandershwar Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Maharishi Markandeshwar Deemed to be University, Mullana, Ambala, Haryana
  • Rohit Singla Maharishi Markandershwar Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Maharishi Markandeshwar Deemed to be University, Mullana, Ambala, Haryana
  • Aneet Mahendra Maharishi Markandershwar Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Maharishi Markandeshwar Deemed to be University, Mullana, Ambala, Haryana
Keywords: Chronic skin conditions, Family members, Primary caregivers, Quality of life.

Abstract

Background: Skin conditions can be very chronic, recalcitrant, and difficult to treat. They have a huge impact on patient’s quality of life. But when it comes to skin problems in children, the impact is on children and their primary caregivers. Although many studies are trying to quantify the impact on quality of life of patients, very less is done for impact on the family members and primary caregivers of the children. Aim: To evaluate the impact on the quality of life of the family members of the affected children and compare the two scales used. Material and Methods: A Performa-based cross-sectional study was conducted in 100 family members presenting to dermatology OPD to consult for their children. Using family dermatology quality of life questionnaire (FDQLI), a 10 item easy-to-use handy questionnaire and impact on family scale (IOF), a 24 item questionnaire, we evaluated the impact on the quality of life of family members of the affected children. Results: Hundred family members of hundred children were included in the study. 48 males and 52 females. Mean age of children was 6.93 years. Chronic Skin diseases which we encountered in children were atopic dermatitis (30%) followed by vitiligo (15%), alopecia areata (13%), psoriasis (8%), chronic urticaria (6%), haemangioma (4%) and others (24%). Most of the children were accompanied by their fathers. Family history of similar disease was positive in 16% of children. Mean FDQLI score of hundred children in the study was 12.71 ± 3.76. Mean IOF score in the study 59.93 ± 4.75. There was a significant positive correlation between IOF and FDQLI scale (p = 0.000). Conclusion: Chronic pediatric skin dermatoses cause a significant effect on the quality of life of their respective family members/primary caregivers. The impact depends on various financial, social, and personal factors and each of them should be given enough importance. Enough questionnaires/scales should be developed to ascertain the impact on these parents and counselling of these parents should become an important part of overall management.
Published
2021-05-15